Monday, 7 July 2014

The process of grief and loss.



  Image: hermelnesss.com
                                                   
         Grief is like an earthquake.The first one bits you and the world falls apart. 

       Even after you put the world together again there are aftershocks, and you 

       never really know when those will come.”(3)


 

         The process of grief and loss

     Definitions

     Loss :
     Loss is defined as a part of life. It is the
     breaking of an attachment to someone
     or something, resulting in change and
     necessitating the process of grief(4)
     Loss is produced by an event which is
     perceived to be negative by the
     individuals involved and results in long
     term changes in situations, relationships
     or cognition(5)
 
     Grief :
     Grief is a natural reaction to loss and
     refers to the process of experiencing the
     psychological, behavioral, social and
     physical reactions of loss. It is the
     internal adaptation to the loss. Grief is a
     continuing development and there is no
     specific timeline for each individuals
     perception of the loss(6)

     Grief may occur before the event takes
     place (anticipatory grief), for instance,
     before immigration,while the event is
     taking place, or after the event takes
     place(6)

     Mourning :
     Mourning is the process that occurs in
     bereavement in order to adjust to the
     loss.The bereaved person undoes the
     psychological bonds that bound them to
     the deceased(7)

      
    “It is like a cut. At first it hurts so 

   bad, and you bleed for a while. 

   You stop the bleeding, the pain 

   subsides,and you put on a bandage

  to hide the mark and help it heal

  l faster.You develop a scab, but every

  once in a while, that scab might

  break and you'll bleed again. Once

  that stops and the pain is gone, you

  still have a scar.That scar becomes a

  part of you, and it's something

  people will know about. It will stay

  with you for the rest of your life, as

  will grief.(3)

     Risk factors and special types of loss
     Risk factors of developing complicated
     grief depends on the circumstances of
     the death such as suicide, sudden death,
     miscarriage, abortion, anticipatory grief,
     AIDS, and traumatic, premature, violent
     or unexpected death. Additionally, risk
     factors also depend on background of
     the bereaved, and if the person has a
     history of depression, anxiety disorders,
     personality disorders, or PTSD after a
     traumatic experience(10)

     Complicated Grief: 
     Worden's twelve clues to identify
     complicated grief after one year of the
     loss:

     1. Intense grief when speaking about the
     deceased.
     2. Intense grief reaction following a
      minor event trigger.
     3. Extreme attachment to the deceased
      belongings.
     4. Most of the conversation is about
      themes related to loss.
     5. The bereaved exhibit the same
      physical symptoms as the deceased.
     6. Making radical life changes.
     7. Depression with persistent guilt and
     lowered self esteem.
     8. Imitating the deceased.
     9. Suicidal idealization.
     10. Unexplainable sadness at certain
      times.
     11. Phobias about illness and death.
     12. Avoidance of death related rituals
      and activities(11)

     Disenfranchised grief:
     When the grief is not acknowledged,
     validated or publicly mourned(8)

     Ambiguous Loss :
     When the person is not sure if the loss
     exists or not. For instance, when a
     relative is lost during the war and may be
     at a refugee camp, or was
     kidnapped(12) 

     Primary Loss, Secondary Loss,
     Presenting Loss :
     Loss can be primary and secondary and
     the presenting loss can be different from
     the primary loss(13) 
 
     Primary Loss :
     The initial loss(13)

    Secondary Loss : All the other losses
     that will happen as a consequence of the
     primary loss such as the loss of role and
     income(13)

                              Image: susanrusso.com
 
      The hardest thing is knowing that

      my mum is really dead and that 

      she is never coming back.This is

     what really hurts. Sometimes I

     have nightmares and flashbacks 

     about my mother, and when I do,

     it feels like the rest of my past is

     coming back, and then the

     grieving process starts all over

     again. Also knowing that the rest

     of my life when I need her most 

     she won't be here. I want to talk to

     her and can't.I want to sit in her

     lap and cry when I need to(3)

     Symptoms Associated with Grief of a
     Parent

     Some of the common feelings present
     after the loss of a parent are:

     1. Loss of relationship and
     opportunity: Regrets for what has not
     been said to them. The relationship that
     cannot be improved any more.
     2. Loss of roles and positions that the
     parents will not fulfill in the future:
     Sadness for moments that will no longer
     be shared with the deceased parent 
    such as the parent will not be present at
     your wedding or never know their
     grandchildren.
     3. Loss of friendship: Several moments
     of achievement will have a mix of
     happiness and sadness for not being 
     able to have the presence of the parent 
     who died.
     4. Loss of protection: For many
     people, parents represent their major
     support system in life and losing them
     brings a sense of being an orphan.
     5. Lost role as caretaker : Even if adult-
     children were not the caregiver for their
     parents, there is always a sense of
     care-taker for the parents in love and the
     grieving children may feel lost for a
     period of time.
     6. Loss of family: When the leader of
     the family dies, the remaining family
     must redefine their relationships and
     there is a sense of disconnection within
     the entire family.
     7. Loss of freedom: When one parent
     dies, there is a need to look after and
     support the surviving parent(14)

     Behavioral Symptoms: 
     Disturbances in sleep
     Altered appetite
     Social withdrawal
     Dreams of the deceased
     Avoiding situations or objects that 
     remind the deceased
     Restlessness
     Crying(11)

     Cognitive Symptoms: 
     Transitory disbelief. If this persists it
     becomes denial
     Confusion
     Difficulty organizing thoughts
     Preoccupation with the deceased
     Auditory and /or visual hallucinations(11)

     Emotional Symptoms:
     Sorrow, fatigue, relief, shock, guilt,
     anxiety and anger. Anger must be
     addressed or may become a
     complication.
     Intense sadness, loneliness, isolation,
     sleep and appetite disturbance are
     normal reactions to grief if experienced
     for a short time,around one year. If 
     these persist, they are considered
     depression, especially if there is also
     the loss of self esteem. Depression 
     must be identified and addressed(15)(11)

     Physical Symptoms: 
     Transitory tight feelings in the throat and
     chest
     Over-sensitivity to noise
     Breathlessness
     Muscular weakness 
     Lack of energy(15)

     How to help someone who is grieving

     Supportive Behaviors:
     Maintain eye contact while talking end
     caring for the person.
     Sit at the same level with your body
     toward the person who is speaking, with
     legs and arms uncrossed.
     Speak using a relaxed, warm voice.
     Stay on the topic, following the person.
     Allow moments of pause and silence to
     reflect.
     Use open-ended questions to help the
      person to continue speaking: “How,”
     “What,” “Could” and avoid “Why”
     questions.
     Encourage more in-depth conversation
     by taking the cues from the person,
     using key words from them and saying
     back to them the most significant things 
     that they said to you.
     Reflect and name their feelings(9)

     Non-Supportive Behaviors: 
     Rigid severe posture
     Taking notes while the person is talking
     Clock watching
     Changing the subject 
     Responding quickly
     Interrupting silence
     Talking about yourself
     Giving advice
     Preaching
     Lecturing
     Over-interpreting
     Asking too many questions(9)

     The importance of the rituals
     Rituals are important for providing
     symbolic connection to the lost person(8)

     Dr. Kenneth Doka proposed four
     functions of ritual:

     Rituals of Continuity:
     These suggest that the person is still 
     part of my life and there exists a
     continuing bond.
     Rituals of Transition:
     These mark a change in the grief
     response.
     Rituals of Affirmation: 
     These acknowledge and reflect on the
     deceased. One example is writing a
     letter to the deceased thanking the 
     person for the caring, love, help and
     support.
     Rituals of Intensification:
     These intensify connection among group
     members and reinforce their common
     identity (8)

     Gender Issues in Bereavement
     There are gender differences in
      processing the loss event(8)

     Women are more socially allowed to
     express their grief and may present
     more physical symptoms as a reaction to
     loss(8)

     Gender differences in bereavement
     expression begin in childhood when
     children learn to behave as their
     parents(8)

     Differences increase in adolescence but
     are more pronounced in adult life.
     Feelings and emotions tend to become
     more differentiated(8)
                   
     Doka found the following consistent
     patterns in masculine grief:
     Pull back, avoid people and grieve on
     their own If active in a church are less
     depressed.
     Have meaningful activities to facilitate
     the grieving process(8)

 
      My loss was very sudden, and I wanted

     to have one last chance to speak with

     my father and tell him that I love him.

     I did not want to see him suffer, but I

     wish I could have some warning so that 

     loss would not have come as a shock (3)

     For women the characteristics are:
     Can express anguish in tears.
     Socialized to be nurturing and
     empathetic
     Are not afraid to discuss grief
     Seek support
     Have difficulty expressing anger
     Tend to feel guilty
     Are caregivers to friends and family 
     Are keepers of the family circle(8)
     Cultural and Spiritual beliefs
     regarding death:
     Different cultures have specific beliefs
     regarding death and these must be
     respected. 

     Below are examples of different cultures
     and their beliefs as to what should
     happen once a person has died: 

     Jewish family members are not
     supposed to see the body after death so
     they can remember the deceased as
     alive rather than dead.

     It is important for African Americans to
     give a “big send-off” for the deceased by
     organizing the best for the funeral and
     may spend a large amount of money in
     order to do their best.

     African Americans and Filipinos believe
     the body cannot be cremated or the soul
     will not go to heaven.

     Hindus and Buddhists believe that 
     prayer, food, water and cremation eases
     the passage to another life and relatives 
     may keep the ashes of the deceased at 
     home. 

     Hispanic, Hindus and Buddhists believe
     that food and water may be set on a 
     windowsill or put on an altar. The water 
     helps the soul look toward the light, and
     prayer helps the soul to rest. Coffee may
     be put on a windowsill to make the spirit
     rest(6)
     
     “To any professionals who think
     they know the grief journey, I beg
     to differ, because grief is handled
     by everyone differently. Grief is
     something that never really ends.
     It definitely gets better over time,
     but it always stays with you, and
     that is not a bad thing. It's great
     to be able to remember all the 
     good times and even the tough 
     times. But everyone does grieve
     differently, so however fast you 
     move in your grief process,
     It is the right speed !”(3)


    
    
Mrs Glaucia Barbosa,
PACFA Reg. Provisional 25212 
MCouns, MQCA(Clinical)  

ABN: 19 476 932 954
References

1. Marx, R. J. & Davidson, S. W. (2003). Facing the Ultimate Loss: Coping with the Death of a Child. Fredonia,Wisconsin: Champion Press, LTD.

2. Freud, S. (1917). Mourning and Melancholia. Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological.Works of Sigmund Freud. London: Hogarth Press.

3. Hughes, L.B. (2005). You are not alone. New York: Scholastic Press

4. Humphrey,G.M. & Zimpfer,D. G. (1996). Counselling for Grief and Bereavement. London:Sage

5. Miller,E. D. & Omarzu,J.(1998). New Directions in Loss research. In J. H. Harvey.(Ed).Perspectives on Loss: A Source-book. (pp.3-20). Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel

6. Guidelines for Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care. Enhanced Version(2006). Deliver Care Service Using a Palliative Approach-Challenge Learning Institute. AsgroveQLD: Brain Matter.

7. Raphael, B. (1994). The Anatomy of Bereavement: a Handbook for the Caring Professionals. London: Hutchinson.

8. Doka, J. & Davidson, J.D. (1998). Living with Grief: Who we are and how we grieve. Hospice of America. Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel

9. Wheeler-Roy,S. & Amyot,B.A. (2004). Grief Counselling Resource Guide. A field Manual.New York State Office of mental Health.

10. Hirch,M.; Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Academy; Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard medical School.(2010). A Harvard medical School Special Health Report. Coping with grief and Loss. A Guide to Healing. Massachusetts: Harvard Health Publication.

11. Worden.J.W. (1991). Grief Counselling and grief Therapy. A Handbook for mental health practitioner, 2nd edn. London: Routledge.

12. Boss,P.(1999). Ambiguous Loss. Cambridge,MA: Harvard University press.

13. Matzo. M. & Sherman, D. W. (2010). Palliative Care Nursing. Quality Care to the End of Life. New York: springer publishing Company.

14. Crump, N. E,M.S.(2001). A Life Care Guide to Grief and Bereavement. Kansas City: Life Care,Inc

15. Barbato, A. & Irwin,H.(1992). Major Therapeutic Systems and the bereaved Client. Australian Psychologist, 27,22-27 
16. Smith,J.A. & Osborn,M (2003). Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.In.J.A.Smith (Ed.),Qualitative Psychology: a Practical Guide to Methods. London: Sage

17. Morrisset,P.J.(2004). The pain of helping: psychological injury of helping professionals. East Sussex: Brunner-Routledge

18. Rothschild, b. (2006). Help for the helper. Self-care strategies for managing burn out and stress. London: W.W.Norton & Company

















              O processo de luto

Definições

Perda:
É uma parte da vida. É a quebra de um vínculo com alguém ou alguma coisa, resultando em mudança e necessitando o processo de luto(4)

A perda é produzida por um evento que é percebido como negativo por parte dos indivíduos envolvidos e resulta em mudanças a longo prazo, de situações, relacionamentos ou cognições(5)

Luto:
O luto é uma reação natural à perda e refere-se ao processo de experimentar reações psicológicas, comportamentais, sociais e físicas de perda. É uma adaptação interna a perda.

O luto é um desenvolvimento contínuo e não há nenhum cronograma específico para a percepção da perda de cada indivíduo(6)
O luto pode ocorrer antes da realização do evento (luto antecipatório), por exemplo, antes de uma imigração, enquanto o evento está ocorrendo, ou após o evento ocorrer(6)

Dor da perda: 
E' o processo que ocorre durante o luto, a fim de ajustar-se à perda. A pessoa em luto se desfaz dos laços psicológicos que a ligavam ao falecido(7)
 
"É como se fosse um corte. No começo dói

muito e você sangra por um tempo.

Entao o sangramento para, a dor

diminui, e você coloca um curativo para

esconder a marca e ajudar a curar.

Você desenvolve uma casca que pode

quebrar e você vai sangrar novamente.

Uma vez que a dor se foi, você ainda tem

uma cicatriz que torna-se parte de você, e 

algo que as pessoas vão saber a seu

respeito. Isso vai ficar com voce para

resto de sua vida ". (3)

Fatores de risco e tipos especiais de perda
Os fatores de risco do desenvolvimento de um luto complicado dependem das circunstâncias da morte como suicídio, morte súbita, aborto, morte fetal, luto antecipatório, AIDS e morte traumática, prematura, violenta ou inesperada. Além disso, fatores de risco também dependem da maturidade, e se a pessoa tem um histórico de depressão, ansiedade, transtornos de personalidade, ou PTSD após uma experiência traumática(10)

Luto complicado:
Doze pistas de Worden para identificar um luto complicado depois de um ano da perda:

1. Dor intensa ao falar sobre o falecido.
2. Reação de luto intensa após um pequeno evento que lembre a perda.
3. Apego extremo ao pertences falecidos.
4. Maior parte da conversa é sobre temas relacionados com a perda.
5. A exposição dos mesmos sintomas físicos do falecido.
6. Fazer mudanças de vida radicais.
7. Depressão com culpa persistente e baixa auto-estima.
8. Imitando o falecido.
9. Ideação suicida.
10. Tristeza inexplicável em determinados momentos.
11. Fobias sobre a doença e a morte.
12. Evitação de rituais relacionados com o falecido(11)

Dor nao reconhecida:
Quando a dor não e' reconhecida, validada ou publicamente aceita(8)

Perda ambígua:
Quando a pessoa não tem certeza se a perda existe ou não. Por exemplo, quando um parente desaparece durante uma guerra e pode estar em um campo de refugiados, ou foi raptado(12)

Perda Primária, Secundária, Aparente:
A perda pode ser primária e secundária e a perda aparente pode ser diferente da perda primária(13)

Perda primária: A perda inicial(13)

Perda secundária: Todas as outras perdas que vão acontecer como conseqüência da perda primária, tais como a perda de função e de renda(13)

                         Image:guardianlv.com
                            
"A coisa mais difícil é saber que minha

mãe está realmente morta e que ela
 
nunca mais vai voltar. Isto é o que dói. Às

vezes eu tenho pesadelos e flashbacks

sobre a minha mãe, e quando acontece,

parece que o resto do meu passado volta,

em seguida, o processo de luto começa 

todo novamente. Além disso, sabendo que

para o resto da minha vida, quando eu

precisar mais dela ela não vai estar aqui. 

Eu quero falar com ela e não posso. Eu 

queria sentar em seu colo e chorar quando

eu preciso "(3)

Sintomas associados com a perda dos pais


Alguns dos sentimentos comuns presentes após a perda de um dos pais são:

1. Perda de relacionamento e oportunidade: Lamentar o que não foi dito a eles. A relação que não pode mais ser melhorada.
2. Perda de papéis e posições que os pais não vão cumprir no futuro: Tristeza por momentos que não serão mais compartilhados com os pais falecidos, como não estarem presente no seu casamento ou nunca conhecerem os netos.
3. Perda de amizade: Vários momentos de conquistas terão uma mistura de felicidade e tristeza por não ter a presença do pai que morreu.
4. Perda de proteção: Para muitas pessoas, os pais representam o seu principal sistema de apoio na vida e perdê-los traz a sensação de ser um órfão.
5. Perda do papel como cuidador: Mesmo se os filhos não cuidavam de seus pais, há sempre um sentimento de cuidado para os pais em amor e os filhos em luto podem se sentir perdidos por um período de tempo.
6. Perda de família: Quando o líder da família morre, a família restante deve redefinir suas relações e há uma sensação de desconexão dentro de toda a família.
7. Perda de liberdade: Quando um dos pais morre, há uma necessidade de cuidar e apoiar o outro sobrevivente(14)

Sintomas comportamentais:
Perturbações no sono.
Apetite alterado.
Retraimento social.
Sonhos com o falecido.
Evitar situações ou objetos que lembram o falecido.
Inquietação.
Chorar(11)

Sintomas cognitivos:
Descrença transitória. Se isso persistir, torna-se negação.
Confusão
Dificuldade para organizar os pensamentos
Preocupação com o falecido
Alucinações auditivas e / ou visuais(11)

Sintomas emocionais:
Dor emocional, fadiga, alívio, choque, culpa, ansiedade e raiva. A raiva deve ser tratada ou pode tornar-se uma complicação. Tristeza intensa, solidão, isolamento, sono e distúrbios do apetite são reações normais à tristeza se experimentadas por um curto período de tempo, em torno de um ano. Se estes persistirem, são considerados depressão, especialmente se houver também a perda da auto-estima. A depressão deve ser identificada e tratada (15) (11)
 
Sintomas físicos:
Sentimentos transitórios de garganta e peito
apertados
Over-sensibilidade ao ruído
Falta de ar
Fraqueza muscular
Falta de energia(15)


Como ajudar alguém que está em luto

Comportamentos de apoio:
Manter contato visual ao falar com a pessoa.
Sentar-se no mesmo nível com o seu corpo em direção a pessoa que está falando, com pernas e braços descruzados.
Falar com uma voz baixa e suave.
Fale sobre o tema, seguindo a pessoa. Permita momentos de pausa e silêncio para refletir.
Use perguntas abertas para ajudar a pessoa a continuar falando: "Como", "O que", "poderia" e evitar perguntas com "porquê".
Incentive mais conversa em profundidade, usar os sinais que a pessoa da', as palavras-chave usadas por elas e repetir para elas as coisas mais importantes que elas disseram a você.
Refletir e nomear seus sentimentos(9)

Comportamentos não favoráveis:
 
Postura rígida
Tomar notas enquanto a pessoa está falando
Olhar o relógio
Mudandar de assunto
Respondender rapidamente
Interromper o silêncio
Falar sobre si mesmo
Dar conselhos
Pregar
Palestras
Over-interpretação
Fazer muitas perguntas(9)

A importância dos rituais
Rituais são importantes para fornecer conexão simbólica com a pessoa perdida(8)

Dr. Kenneth Doka propôs quatro funções do ritual:

Rituais de Continuidade:
Sugerem que a pessoa ainda faz parte da minha vida e existe um vínculo para continuar.
Rituais de Transição:
Marcam uma mudança na resposta da dor.
Rituais de Afirmação:
Reconhecem e refletem sobre o falecido. Um exemplo é escrever uma carta para o falecido agradecendo a pessoa para o carinho, amor, ajuda e apoio.
Rituais de Intensificação:
Intensificam a conexão entre os membros do grupo e reforçam a sua identidade comum(8)

Questões de gênero no luto
Existem diferenças de gênero no processamento do evento de perda(8)

As mulheres são mais socialmente autorizadas a expressar sua dor e podem apresentar mais sintomas físicos como reação à perda(8)

As diferenças de gênero na expressão de luto começam na infância, quando as crianças aprendem a se comportar como seus pais(8)

Diferenças aumentam na adolescência, mas são mais pronunciadas na vida adulta. Sentimentos e emoções tendem a se tornar mais diferenciados (8)

Doka encontrou os seguintes padrões consistentes no luto masculino:
Se retrair, evitar pessoas e chorar por conta própria.
Quando ativos em uma igreja são menos deprimidos.
Ter atividades significativas para facilitar o processo de luto(8)

 
     Image: chaseroflight.deviantart.com

Minha perda foi muito repentina, e eu

queria ter tido uma última chance de falar

com o meu pai e dizer a ele que eu o amo

muito.Eu não queria vê-lo sofrer, mas eu

ter tido algum aviso de modo que a perda

não teria vindo como um choque (3)
 
Para as mulheres as características são: 
Pode expressar a angústia em lágrimas
Se aproxima para ter carinho e empatia
Não têm medo de discutir tristeza
Procura apoio
Têm dificuldade em expressar raiva
Tendem a se sentir culpadas
Cuidam de amigos e familiares
São guardiãns do círculo familiar(8)

Crenças culturais e espirituais sobre a morte:
Diferentes culturas têm crenças específicas sobre a morte e estas devem ser respeitadas.

Abaixo estão alguns exemplos de diferentes culturas e suas crenças sobre o que deve acontecer quando uma pessoa morreu:

Membros da família judaica não devem ver o corpo após a morte, para que possam se lembrar do falecido como vivo em vez de morto.

É importante para os afro-americanos dar um "grande bota-fora" para o falecido, organizando o melhor para o funeral e podem gastar uma grande quantidade de dinheiro, a fim de fazer o seu melhor.
Americanos e filipinos africanos acreditam que o corpo não pode ser cremado ou a alma não vai para o céu.

Hindus e budistas acreditam que a oração, comida, água e cremação facilita a passagem para outra vida e parentes podem manter as cinzas dos falecidos em casa. 

Hispânicas, hindus e budistas acreditam que comida e água podem ser colocados em uma janela ou em um altar. A água ajuda a alma a olhar em direção à luz, e oração ajuda a alma a descansar. O café pode ser colocado em uma janela para fazer o espírito descançar(6)
 
"Para todos os profissionais que

pensam que sabem sobre o luto, eu

imploro para diferenciar o processo de

cada individuo, pois a dor é vivenciada

por todos de forma diferente. O luto é algo

que nunca termina. A pessoa se sente

definitivamente melhor com o passar do

tempo, mas o luto fica sempre com ela, o

que não é uma coisa ruim. É ótimo

ser capaz de se lembrar de todos os bons

momentos e até mesmo os difíceis.

Mas todo mundo chora demaneira

diferente, por isso, por mais rápido que a

pessoa se mova no processo de luto, essa

e' a velocidade certa! "(3)
  








































Mrs Glaucia Barbosa,
PACFA Reg. Provisional 25212 
MCouns, MQCA(Clinical)  
ABN: 19 476 932 954
 
References

1. Marx, R. J. & Davidson, S. W. (2003). Facing the Ultimate Loss: Coping with the Death of a Child. Fredonia,Wisconsin: Champion Press, LTD.

2. Freud, S. (1917). Mourning and Melancholia. Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud. London: Hogarth Press.

3. Hughes, L.B. (2005). You are not alone. New York: Scholastic Press

4. Humphrey,G.M. & Zimpfer,D. G. (1996). Counselling for Grief and Bereavement. London:Sage

5. Miller,E. D. & Omarzu,J.(1998). New Directions in Loss research. In J. H. Harvey.(Ed).Perspectives on Loss: A Source-book. (pp.3-20). Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel

6. Guidelines for Palliative Approach in Residential Aged Care. Enhanced Version(2006). Deliver Care Service Using a Palliative Approach-Challenge Learning Institute. Asgrove QLD: Brain Matter.

7. Raphael, B. (1994). The Anatomy of Bereavement: a Handbook for the Caring Professionals. London: Hutchinson.

8. Doka, J. & Davidson, J.D. (1998). Living with Grief: Who we are and how we grieve. Hospice of America. Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel

9. Wheeler-Roy,S. & Amyot,B.A. (2004). Grief Counselling Resource Guide. A field Manual. New York State Office of mental Health.

10. Hirch,M.; Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Academy; Instructor in Psychiatry at Harvard medical School.(2010). A Harvard medical School Special Health Report. Coping with grief and Loss. A Guide to Healing. Massachusetts: Harvard Health Publication.

11. Worden.J.W. (1991). Grief Counselling and grief Therapy. A Handbook for mental health practitioner, 2nd edn. London: Routledge.

12. Boss,P.(1999). Ambiguous Loss. Cambridge,MA: Harvard University press.

13. Matzo. M. & Sherman, D. W. (2010). Palliative Care Nursing. Quality Care to the End of Life. New York: springer publishing Company.

14. Crump, N. E,M.S.(2001). A Life Care Guide to Grief and Bereavement. Kansas City: Life Care,Inc

15. Barbato, A. & Irwin,H.(1992). Major Therapeutic Systems and the bereaved Client. Australian Psychologist, 27,22-27 
16. Smith,J.A. & Osborn,M (2003). Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis.In.J.A.Smith (Ed.),Qualitative Psychology: a Practical Guide to Methods. London: Sage

17. Morrisset,P.J.(2004). The pain of helping: psychological injury of helping professionals. East Sussex: Brunner-Routledge

18. Rothschild, b. (2006). Help for the helper. Self-care strategies for managing burn out and stress. London: W.W.Norton & Company





No comments:

Post a comment